Embracing Digital Transformation: Real-life Use Cases in Energy & Utilities

A handful of utilities are piloting and, in a few cases, even deploying wearable technologies, but the greatest share of interest is and has been around augmented reality. There is an impressive, concerted effort in the utility space by researchers and vendors to thoroughly investigate the technology to see if it’s safe and a right fit for the industry. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has taken on a great deal of forward-thinking testing of AR, recognizing that standards will have to be determined if there’s to be widespread adoption.

EPRI

EPRI has been a part of several companies’ efforts to pilot AR in electric and utility operations, including Duke Energy and Con Edison. With Duke, EPRI deployed Atheer’s AiR platform to demonstrate how hands-free AR improves productivity and safety and shortens power outage recovery time. In addition to enhancing power restoration, another possibility is using AR to bridge the techno-generational divide. In other research, EPRI is studying the health and safety impacts of AR on workers, keeping an eye out for risks like eyestrain and reduced situational awareness; and sensor-equipped non-AR wearables that can help keep workers safe.


Duke Energy 

Duke’s emerging technologies unit has been a lead experimenter with augmented reality, trying out multiple tools like Atheer’s AiR platform with EPRI for inventory management and basic equipment maintenance, since 2014. Duke also sees potential for training and remote collaboration/troubleshooting in the field. Duke and EPRI worked with Verizon to simulate a storm response, equipping line workers with RealWear’s HMT-1 which uses GIS to provide critical information for repairing damaged infrastructure (ex. where a downed utility pole should be located). The solution could also send automatic equipment/parts orders to a utility warehouse, saving a lot of time.


Con Edison

EPRI teamed up with the New York utility to test various uses for AR, including substation switching, a task that can be dangerous, disrupt electricity and rack up costs, and substation inspections. Con Ed sees further potential in AR for improving worker safety, grid operations and maintenance.

AR glasses could help Con Ed employees in the field with complex tasks like locating buried transmission infrastructure and then making the necessary repairs. They could use smart glasses to access remote expertise. AR could also prevent errors by pointing workers to the right piece of equipment, showing relevant maintenance history and equipment specifications, etc.  


GE Renewable Energy

GE Renewable Energy successfully trialed Upskill’s Skylight platform for smart glasses to the tune of a 34% improvement in productivity in initial trials. It was, in fact, the first time the workers participating in the trial had ever use smart eyewear. Testing took place at a factory in Pensacola, Florida; where wind turbine assembly workers would have to stop what they were doing to check if they were installing parts correctly, referencing a manual or calling someone to make sure. Wearing glasses that projected digital checklists, diagrams, instructions, images and videos that one would otherwise view on a 2d screen directly in the user’s line of sight; employees were able to work more efficiently. A video released by GE makes a strong case for AR. It shows a side-by-side time-lapse comparison of a technician wiring a wind turbine control box the standard way and that same worker doing the wiring 34% faster guided by AR instructions in his field of view. How quickly hands-free AR glasses could tighten the skills gap!


Siemens

Siemens partnered with DAQRI to study the benefits of augmented reality in gas burner assembly training. The trial focused on different “personas” to see how an AR gas burner training app might affect the performance of different types of workers. At the Siemens Power Service Training Center in Berlin, four workers – two novices, one expert, and one worker who had last done an assembly a year before – participated in the pilot, using the app under realistic conditions. Testing revealed benefits to all the worker personas, reducing training time for new trainees and more experienced employees alike. In addition to accelerating learning time, Siemens believes AR could help avoid errors, streamline data collection, and speed up report generatio.


Scotland’s Fife College

In June 2017, students at Fife College in Scotland, “the next generation of offshore wind turbine technicians,” began learning in the school’s new Immersive Hybrid Reality (iHR) lab. The lab provides highly realistic XR training environments and scenarios that are difficult or impossible to simulate in real life. For instance, an actual offshore wind turbine would be over 325 feet above the water. In the lab, students are able to perform detailed inspections of the top of a virtual 7-megawatt offshore wind turbine – even under changing weather conditions, with the sound of the wind around them – while still seeing their own hands and holding real tools.


Toms River Municipal Utilities Authority

This year, the New Jersey utility piloted vGIS, a geographic information system (GIS) visualization platform by Meenim for visualizing overhead and underground infrastructure with Microsoft’s HoloLens headset. The solution essentially allows the wearer to “see” utility lines in real time (for ex. when digging up a street) and it supports both voice and gesture controls so the user has free use of his hands. Take the scenario of a downed telephone pole in the street; with vGIS, all field personnel are able to see the utilities under their feet, which is critical to planning and maintaining critical infrastructure.


We Energies, Milwaukee

For an industry-backed study including Marquette University, EPRI researchers recently visited a We Energies coal plant to observe workers using both monocular (RealWear) and binocular (HoloLens) AR headsets to perform different jobs. In multiple field tests, special attention was paid to the ergonomics of using AR in an industrial environment, with cameras and sensors monitoring users’ eyes, head, neck and shoulders. The question was whether the headsets would assist or distract/inhibit utility workers, who typically work 12 hours, walk several miles and examine 300 pieces of equipment in a day. We Energies workers seemed to prefer RealWear’s device to view checklists, while the research team is looking forward to when more meters, poles, etc. are connected to the IoT and AR becomes even more useful. More devices will be tested at other sites before the final report is released in 2019.


NYPA

I’ve saved New York Power Authority, the largest state-owned public utility in the country, for last due to its impressive digital roadmap. In December 2017, a utility collaborative on the use of wearables to monitor workers’ health was announced, NYPA included. But NYPA’s interest in emerging tech goes beyond wearables: The utility is aiming to be the first full-scale, all-digital utility with a digitally-enabled workforce. To that end, NYPA is installing sensors, smart meters and other data collecting devices in its customers’ buildings and facilities, creating digital twins of its large clients’ energy systems; the data analytics from these efforts should increase productivity and create new value-added services for NYPA’s customers (like helping them optimize use).

The company has created a smart operation center for its power plants, transmission lines, and substations; here, data like temperature, power loads, vibrations, pressure, emissions, moisture and strain is fed, with the goal of becoming proactive vs. reactive. “Digitizing everything” will allow NYPA to predict problems, reduce unplanned downtime, lower maintenance costs, and minimize operational risks. And how do you bring the workforce into this digital grid? Through Augmented Reality.

 

The Enterprise Wearable Technology Summit (EWTS) is an annual conference dedicated to the use of wearable technology for business and industrial applications. As the leading event for enterprise wearables, EWTS is where enterprises go to innovate with the latest in wearable tech, including heads-up displays, AR/VR/MR, body- and wrist-worn devices, and even exoskeletons. The 5th annual EWTS will be held October 9-11, 2018 at The Fairmont in Austin, TX. For more details, please visit the conference website.


Augmented World Expo (AWE), the world’s #1 AR+VR conference and expo, comes to Munich, Germany on October 18-19, 2018. CXOs, designers, developers, futurists, analysts, investors and top press will gather at the MOC Exhibition Center to learn, inspire, partner and experience first-hand the most exciting industry of our times. Tickets now available at www.aweeu.com.

Empowering the Power Sector: The Use of Wearable and Immersive Tech in Utilities

Today’s power and utility companies are navigating a period of uncertainty: Political, environmental and social pressures are making it critical for the power sector to evolve the technology and business models by which it has traditionally operated. Radical policy changes such as regulation rollbacks and tax reforms, severe weather including historic floods, hurricanes and fires, a rapidly retiring workforce and changing electricity needs are testing utilities, compelling them to embrace digitalization… with caution.

And it’s not just in the U.S.; energy markets around the world are changing. As power grids become smarter, electricity gets cleaner, and consumers have more choices; utilities are rethinking how they generate and sell electricity, how they can make their operations more intelligent and give customers more control while safeguarding reliability, affordability and safety.


State of the Power Sector: Trends and pain points

 Changing Fuel Mix

Power generation today is increasingly diverse and decentralized. The rise of cheaper renewable and distributed energy sources has led to a kind of fork in the road: How do traditional energy providers strike a balance between maintaining and repairing aging infrastructure and investing in the future? The trends towards grid parity and liberalization of the energy market are clear: 50 gigawatts of coal-fired generation capacity were retired between 2012 and 2017, and BMI expects the capacity of renewables (wind, solar, etc.) to double by 2026. Some analysts are even saying the cost of delivering power via grid could surpass that of consumers producing and storing their own energy as early as 2022.


The New Energy Customer

Becoming more responsive to customer demands (and more resilient in the face of extreme weather) requires more than just strengthening poles and wires; it means stemming the tide of outgoing knowledge and training the next generation of utility workers to do their jobs better, faster and safer. It means new services and charging models that give customers more control over their energy consumption and even manage the surplus energy generated by consumers-turned-prosumers. A digital grid powered by automation and data intelligence will help synchronize the new complex network of fuel and power providers to deliver increased flexibility, cleaner energy, faster service, and lower costs to consumers.


Making Sense of the Data

 The large amount and variety of data collected as the grid gets more connected – data from smart equipment, customers (mobile notifications and smart meter data), and even drones (visual GPS, infrared LiDar, etc.) – is a challenge in and of itself. Processed and analyzed correctly, this information could help power companies stay on top of outages and damaged assets, anticipate demand and repairs, optimize scheduling, and improve customer service. But to translate all this data into actionable insight, utilities must invest in advanced data analytics along with the tools to feed information to change agents “on the ground.”


A Dying Breed

With half of their workforce expected to retire over the next several years, it’s critical for power and utility companies to be agile and adapt. The industry, however, is dealing with both decades-old infrastructure unfamiliar to younger engineers and newer smart grid technology alien to veteran workers; not to mention low-tech work tools and inadequate training methods like paper and pencil, slide decks and videos.

In addition to capturing outgoing expertise, utility organizations need to make new employees highly proficient quickly. A Department of Energy survey last year found that there are two types of utility workers in short supply: Those with firsthand knowledge of legacy systems and those with the training or qualifications to move up and replace the former. And though 74% of employees are ready to learn new skills, the number of different devices and generations of technology in a typical substation today – many lacking maintenance and repair records or even user manuals – complicates training.


Applications of XR and Wearables in Utilities

If you’re wondering how utilities are going to maintain revenue as the demand for non-renewable electricity continues to decline; you’re not alone. In order to make necessary investments and keep rates competitive given all the new players, utilities have to look beyond power generation for opportunities to reduce costs and increase productivity. One option they’re exploring are new and continually improving wearable and immersive technologies, especially augmented reality. In fact, despite heavy regulations, energy and utilities are one of the top three verticals buying Augmented Reality glasses (ABI Research).


Efficiency & Productivity

A quick response time in a power outage depends on technicians being able to quickly and accurately assess the damage and expedite repairs; but what if field workers lack the knowledge or experience to do so? This scenario is becoming more common as experienced utility workers retire before transmitting their specialized knowledge to their replacements and as the required skills for the job change and diversify (along with fuel supplies). Smart glasses present a solution in the form of on-demand data, step-by-step instructions, and over-the-shoulder remote coaching. If AR overlays fail – information like asset type, operating stats, maintenance history, etc. overlaid on a piece of equipment – see-what-I-see assistance from an office-based, expert worker would speed the job along while leaving both hands free for actual repairs. This has the added benefit of easing the impact of changing workforce demographics and enabling utilities to do more with less, as one expert in an office can remotely mentor an entire team of younger technicians.

AI-based data solutions and even virtual reality models could help predict failures to distribution equipment and other power quality issues, and furthermore dispatch the closest technician to the job and automatically order replacement parts. And with new data sources, existing utility systems of information like asset management, distribution management and geographic information systems will improve, as will the AR overlays and virtual SMEs guiding workers in the field. All of the above speeds up power restoration, improves customer service, and reduces operating and maintenance costs.


Safety

With employees spread out at multiple field locations, keeping the utility workforce safe is a challenge. Usually, engineers’ status and location are known only if they check in regularly. But body-worn wearables equipped with sensors that monitor location and risk status to workers, including hazards in their environment and key biometrics, allow real-time incident reporting and safety warnings. Real-life examples include smart badges that detect when the wearer has fallen from a pylon, smart clothing that can monitor heart rate and heat stress while climbing a transmission pole, and smart wristbands with built-in voltage detection.


Training

Smart glasses both stream and record, meaning institutional knowledge can be reserved in the form of first-person training videos recorded by seasoned workers wearing smart glasses. Additionally, remote guidance “sessions” can be recorded, serving in the moment to help younger workers on the job and later as training material to look back at. The same can be used to design VR or MR training simulations for incoming employees, as we now have the studies to back up the effectiveness of immersive experiences over traditional learning methods.

By wearing an AR display, utility workers in any job can have immediate access to the resources and real-time intelligence they need right in their field of view. This error-proofs the work of newer employees while simultaneously training them on the job. Moreover, the flexibility afforded by XR in training will be absolutely critical as the skills and knowledge required of the next-generation utility workforce change in sync with power generation itself.


With tremendous industry-wide support, especially from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the power sector is taking a long-term yet effective approach to not only piloting the latest in immersive wearable tech but also producing the studies – hard data – to ultimately facilitate industry-wide adoption. See my next post for use cases!

 

The Enterprise Wearable Technology Summit (EWTS) is an annual conference dedicated to the use of wearable technology for business and industrial applications. As the leading event for enterprise wearables, EWTS is where enterprises go to innovate with the latest in wearable tech, including heads-up displays, AR/VR/MR, body- and wrist-worn devices, and even exoskeletons. The 5th annual EWTS will be held October 9-11, 2018 at The Fairmont in Austin, TX. For more details, please visit the conference website.


Augmented World Expo (AWE), the world’s #1 AR+VR conference and expo, comes to Munich, Germany on October 18-19, 2018. CXOs, designers, developers, futurists, analysts, investors and top press will gather at the MOC Exhibition Center to learn, inspire, partner and experience first-hand the most exciting industry of our times. Tickets now available at www.aweeu.com.

3 Great Use Cases of Wearable Tech for EHS

According to the most recent data from the International Labor Organization, every 15 seconds a worker dies from a work-related accident or disease. On top of 2.3 million deaths per year from occupational accidents, over 313 million workers suffer non-fatal work injuries. The great human cost also has an economic impact: For employers, on-the-job accidents cost billions of dollars annually due to production downtime and workers’ compensation fees.

Can technology help prevent work-related accidents and diseases? The majority of workplace injuries are easily preventable through real-time monitoring of workers. After all, connected workers – aware of (and sensed by) their environment through IoT technologies – are inherently safer.

Wearable technology can greatly improve workplace safety. For example,

  • Smart bands and sensors embedded in clothing and gear can be used to monitor workers’ health and wellbeing by tracking such factors as heartrate, respiration, heat stress, fatigue and exposure. Notifications can be sent to workers’ wearable devices when critical levels are reached.
  • Machine and environmental sensors can provide contextual information to field workers to help keep them informed and aware of their surroundings; and wearable GPS tracking can ensure they keep out of hazardous areas.
  • Smart glasses and other HUDs allow employees to access work instructions and manuals in the field, in addition to enabling remote guidance. This aids their productivity and makes them safer, since accuracy (doing a job correctly) and safety go hand-in-hand.
  • Camera-equipped wearables can also be used to document a job or incident for later review. Such data can be utilized for safety training and to identify safety issues in the work environment.

In addition to providing real-time safety information and alerts to workers, wearable devices make for a safer workplace simply by the way in which they are used, i.e. hands-free. There are some great real-world use cases of wearable technology for environmental health and safety. Read on to learn how three major enterprises are using wearables of different form factors to augment their safety efforts:

North Star Bluescope Steel

This steel producer is working with IBM on developing a cognitive platform that taps into IBM Watson Internet of Things technology to keep employees safe in dangerous environments.

The IBM Employee Wellness and Safety Solution gathers and analyzes sensor data collected from smart helmets and wristbands to provide real-time alerts to workers and their managers. If a worker’s physical wellbeing is compromised or safety procedures aren’t being followed, preventative measures can be taken.

North Star is using the solution to combat heat stress, collecting data from a variety of sensors installed to continuously monitor a worker’s skin body temperature, heart rate, galvanic skin response and activity level, along with the temperature and humidity of the work environment. If temperatures rise to unsafe levels, the technology provides safety guidelines to each employee based upon his or her individual metrics. For instance, the solution might advise an at-risk worker to take a 10-minute break in the shade.

With the IBM Employee Wellness and Safety Solution, data flows from the worker to the IBM Watson IoT platform and then to a supervisor for intervention/prevention. Watson can detect hazardous combinations from the wearable sensor data, like high skin temperature plus a raised heart rate and lack of movement (indicating heat stress,) and notify the appropriate person to take action. This same platform could be used to prevent excessive exposure to radiation, noise, toxic gases and more.

John Deere

John Deere, best known as a manufacturer of agricultural equipment and machinery, is using Virtual Reality headsets to evaluate and assess the “assembly feasibility” of new machine designs. Performing ergonomic evaluations in VR improves the safety of production employees by revealing the biomechanics of putting a proposed machine together. High risk processes can be identified and corrected before they pose a problem for the assembler on the shop floor.

In one of these VR reviews at John Deere, an operator puts on a headset and becomes completely immersed in a virtual production environment. Reviewers can see what the operator sees, and determine whether a potential design is safe to manufacture. They can see all the safety aspects that would go into assembling the product, including how the worker’s posture would be affected, whether there is chance of physical injury, what kinds of tools would be required, etc.

John Deere believes VR-aided design evaluations can result in less fatigue, fewer accidents, and greater productivity for its manufacturing team, and the method has already proven effective in reducing injuries at the company. Learn more about this use case at EWTS 2017, where Janelle Haines, Ergonomic Analyst and Biomedical Engineer at John Deere, will participate in an interactive workshop on “Leveraging Virtual Reality in the Enterprise.”

National Grid

The electricity and gas utility company is exploring wearable tech for lone worker health and safety. National Grid believes wearables can have multiple advantages in the workplace, including improving safety as well as speeding up the process of repairs and reducing costs. The ngLabs team is responsible for looking at the latest technologies; in one of its first projects, the team is focusing on the critical worker:

The project uses interactive wristbands developed by Microsoft to monitor the health, safety and wellbeing of workers who operate alone or remotely. The smart bands track location, measure vital statistics like heart rate, and enable remote/lone workers to send a signal to colleagues when they’ve arrived on site or checked out without having to make a call or fill out paperwork. Information is captured quickly, making it easier to spot problems and send alerts if something goes wrong.

Hear more about this use case in San Diego this May—David Goldsby, Technology Innovation Manager at National Grid, will present a case study on “Digital Disruption and Consumerization in Utilities” at EWTS ’17.

 

About EWTS 2017:

The 3rd annual Enterprise Wearable Technology Summit 2017 taking place May 10-12, 2017 in San Diego, California is the leading event for wearable technology in enterprise. It is also the only true enterprise event in the wearables space, with the speakers and audience members hailing from top enterprise organizations across the industry spectrum. Consisting of real-world case studies, engaging workshops, and expert-led panel discussions on such topics as enterprise applications for Augmented and Virtual Reality, head-mounted displays, and body-worn devices, plus key challenges, best practices, and more; EWTS is the best opportunity for you to hear and learn from those organizations who have successfully utilized wearables in their operations.